Communities of Practice

“Communities of practices” (CoP) are unique because they learn how to improve their respected fields with experienced professionals  rather than consumer complaints.  Instead of improving a product, they improve the industry.   However , I don’t envision myself joining nor starting a unique CoP that serves the needs of students as a student, although after being in my craft for some years, I will more than likely start or join a unique CoP!

I researched three web sites on CoP and I found basically all the same philosophy in general. Getting people of like careers together and focus on the entire industry with hopes of improving it through experiences and research.

I think that CoP’s are needed as well as the focus groups that improve the certain product. The product caters to the consumer, the Cop caters to the industry.

Resources:
http://www.usq.edu.au/cops/

http://www.funderstanding.com/content/communities-of-practice

http://www.learning-theories.com/communities-of-practice-lave-and-wenger.html


RSS feeds

RSS feeds, from my understanding, work the same as blogs.  Except instead of your personal learning environment checking up on you every so often to see what you’ve done new, they’ll get an automatic update of everything you do as you post.

In subscribing to websites of interest, you are more inclined to be in the know and in the now!

All these blog sites and subcriber sites are geared to keep the informer informed of what’s going on in their particular industry.

The rss impact is huge and more companies are using this as a communication avenue.  Building, designing and powering websites is an industry that I’m growing into and I to will be apart of the rss community.

Links

http://particletree.com/features/the-importance-of-rss/

http://www.readarticlesonline.com/Art/77423/278/The-Significance-of-Blog-Commenting-for-an-Effective-Web-site.html

http://www.whatisrss.com/


Personal Learning Environments

Wikipedia defines Personal Learning Environments (PLE) as “…systems that help learners take control of and manage their own learning.  This includes providing support for learners to: set their own learning goals, manage their learning, both content and process, and communicate with others in the process of learning.”  The Wikipedia article goes on to state, “…PLE puts the individual learner at the center, connecting him or her to both information and to communities that “… provide personal spaces, which belong to and are controlled by the user, [and also provide] a social context by offering means to connect with other personal spaces for effective knowledge sharing and collaborative knowledge creation.”

John Orlando, Ph D, wrote an article entitled Personal Learning Environments Help Students Extend Learning Beyond the Classroom; and in this article he mentions how social media allows institutions to provide students with a “Personal Learning Environment” (PLE) for pursuing their intellectual interests outside of the classroom.  And because the PLE would be public, unlike the closed Learning Management System, the PLE would be made up of students and non-students from around the world.  Dr. Orlando claims that everything about your PLE would revolve around your interest, and even though your passion would eventually fizzle, until then you would be honing your communication and thinking skills through collaboration with others—which will benefit you in any future pursuits.

Educause wrote an article entitled, “7 Things you Should Know about Personal Learning Environments,” which are: 1. What is it: which states the term personal learning environment (PLE) describes the tools, communities, and services that constitute the individual educational platforms learners use to direct their own learning and pursue educational goals. 2. Who is doing it: credits various colleges and universities for applying the PLE concept. 3. How does it work: For the campuses that formally support PLEs, instructors or institu­tions generally provide a framework for student study. This frame­work might be a desktop application or a web-based service and could include links to web tools. Students are encouraged to draw upon these networks and collections of external resources, using them as tools for discovery in an effort to expand their learning experiences beyond campus boundaries. The result becomes a PLE when the integration of resources starts to include the work and voice of others as readily as a student’s own critical reflection and scholarly work. 4. Why is it significant: Be­cause they emphasize relationships, PLEs can promote authentic learning by incorporating expert feedback into learning activities and resources. A PLE also puts students in charge of their own learning processes, challenging them to reflect on the tools and resources that help them learn best. By design, a PLE is created from self-direction, and therefore the responsibility for organiza­tion—and thereby for learning—rests with the learner. 5. What are the downsides:  While the PLE offers the opportunity to sharpen these skills, instructors may find it useful to discuss the hallmarks of a well-thought-out argument and to underscore caution in ac­cepting “facts” presented by peers and anonymous posters.  6. Where is it going: As increased mobile access shifts the technological landscape, the PLE may represent our acknowledgment of the need to orga­nize and present the tools, resources, and gateways that scholars use on a regular basis so that they are available with instant access from any location.  And 7. What are the implications for teaching and learning: The concept of the PLE marks a fundamental change in the role resources (people and media) play in teaching and learning.  The goal for the student shifts from a need to collect information to a need to draw connections from it—to acquire it, disseminate it, and collaborate in its use. Furthermore, the use of PLEs may herald a greater emphasis on the role that metacognition plays in learning, enabling students to actively consider and reflect upon the specific tools and resources that lead to a deeper engagement with content to facilitate their learning.

PLE’s will prove to be needed in the web design industry because new programs and ideas are evolving everyday.  So the best way to stay in the loop is with your PLE. 

Educause wrote an article entitled, “7 Things you Should Know about Personal Learning Environments,” which are: 1. What is it: which states the term personal learning environment (PLE) describes the tools, communities, and services that constitute the individual educational platforms learners use to direct their own learning and pursue educational goals. 2. Who is doing it: credits various colleges and universities for applying the PLE concept. 3. How does it work: For the campuses that formally support PLEs, instructors or institu­tions generally provide a framework for student study. This frame­work might be a desktop application or a web-based service and could include links to web tools. Students are encouraged to draw upon these networks and collections of external resources, using them as tools for discovery in an effort to expand their learning experiences beyond campus boundaries. The result becomes a PLE when the integration of resources starts to include the work and voice of others as readily as a student’s own critical reflection and scholarly work. 4. Why is it significant: Be­cause they emphasize relationships, PLEs can promote authentic learning by incorporating expert feedback into learning activities and resources. A PLE also puts students in charge of their own learning processes, challenging them to reflect on the tools and resources that help them learn best. By design, a PLE is created from self-direction, and therefore the responsibility for organiza­tion—and thereby for learning—rests with the learner. 5. What are the downsides:  While the PLE offers the opportunity to sharpen these skills, instructors may find it useful to discuss the hallmarks of a well-thought-out argument and to underscore caution in ac­cepting “facts” presented by peers and anonymous posters.  6. Where is it going: As increased mobile access shifts the technological landscape, the PLE may represent our acknowledgment of the need to orga­nize and present the tools, resources, and gateways that scholars use on a regular basis so that they are available with instant access from any location.  And 7. What are the implications for teaching and learning: The concept of the PLE marks a fundamental change in the role resources (people and media) play in teaching and learning.  The goal for the student shifts from a need to collect information to a need to draw connections from it—to acquire it, disseminate it, and collaborate in its use. Furthermore, the use of PLEs may herald a greater emphasis on the role that metacognition plays in learning, enabling students to actively consider and reflect upon the specific tools and resources that lead to a deeper engagement with content to facilitate their learning.

PLE’s will prove to be needed in the web design industry because new programs and ideas are evolving everyday.  So the best way to stay in the loop is with your PLE.


What is Web 2.0?

What is Web 2.0?  Based on my research, Web 2.0 is a web-based operation that allows the user to be a point of reference.  In support of this statement, an article found on Wikipedia states, (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Web_2.0), “A Web 2.0 site allows users to interact and collaborate with each other in a social media dialogue as consumers of user-generated content in a virtual community, in contrast to websites where users (prosumers) are limited to the active viewing of content that they created and controlled.” According to this same source, “…the third important part of Web 2.0 is the Social Web which is a fundamental shift in the way we communicate. The social web consists of a number of online tools and platforms where people share their perspectives, opinions, thoughts and experiences. Web 2.0 Applications tend to interact much more with the end user. As such, the end user is not only a user of the application but also a participant by: Podcasting, Blogging, Tagging, Contributing to RSS, Social bookmarking and Social networking.”

In a website entitled Web 2.0 (http://www.paulgraham.com/web20.html), you will observe a change in the meaning of Web 2.0.  At first it was described as what’s to come at the first Web 2.0 Conference.  By the second Web 2.0 Conference, it seemed to mean something about democracy.

There’s a lot of confusion of what Web 2.0 really means.  My third source (http://oreilly.com/web2/archive/what-is-web-20.html) states that when the term “Web 2.0” had clearly taken hold because of Google’s more that 9.5 million citations, “…there’s still a huge amount of disagreement about just what Web 2.0 means, with some people decrying it as a meaningless marketing buzzword, and others accepting it as the new conventional wisdom.”

In my second source, the writer states that, “The fact that Google is a “Web 2.0” company shows that, while meaningful, the term is also rather bogus. It’s like the word “allopathic.” It just means doing things right, and it’s a bad sign when you have a special word for that.”  This statement describes exactly what I feel/think about Web 2.0!


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